In my forest series – Hidden landscapes



The works on canvas, whether by way of the medium used, or by the manner through which the inner vision was expressed, no doubt represent the aesthetic device that necessitated the most substantial amount of vision from the entire project. This is not due to the fact that this work was executed entirely by me as you may know, I do not intentionally attribute added value when

this comes into play. Indeed, in this regard, I would like to recall what I previously told you in relation to the execution of this type of work. Once the implementation of the engraved images was achieved, these were mechanically imprinted onto the canvas as opposed to the normal process, where a image is directly applied to the canvas. The next steps of the process (signifying manual

labour undertaken by me) were all, or almost all, anticipated and aspired to, in the sense that the final work was planned and implemented in accordance with a previously established overall vision and in relation to pre-defined aesthetic qualities which I originally envisioned.





Paesaggio invisibile – hidden landscape (PI-014) 2014, mixed media, cm 240×160



I guess you could say that I used myself in the realisation of a part of the project, as I employed the assistance of many distinct individuals throughout the execution of other work. The total subservience to a pre-existing vision and a pre-defined aesthetic quality, stemmed from the need to maintain control over the work, in order to ensure that the end result as originally foreseen, was not affected by the technical

virtuosity or the momentary vision. The inevitable requirement for mediation (that is, the defined use of a physical intermediary mechanism) between that which was thought and that which was realised involved, as mentioned, the need to direct (or organise) the work as a whole, in such a way that it retained the same qualities and vision in its actualised unity.







Paesaggio invisibile – hidden landscape (PI-010) 2012, mixed media, cm 184×132



In the case of this work, the control over myself was, therefore, implemented through an even more defined and articulate executive discipline, to which I strictly adhered: complete the work within a few days, maintain an appropriate interval of time between working days, and maintain a constant correlation between the project and its implementation.

The challenge was to remain as close and as committed as possible to the original demands of the work, ensuring that the manual skill (or ability), which inevitably comes into play during a prolonged activity, does not surpass the inner aesthetic aspirations of the work. I attempted, therefore, through a process of constant interruptions (while starting and restarting the work all

over again) to neutralise the virtuosic apprehensions and the perfection of the artistic strokes to which, unfortunately, repetitive work is susceptible. The process of attempting to remain non-professional, in reality, allowed me to preserve that intended vision, which was at least I hope successfully attained.



Paesaggio invisibile – hidden landscape (PI-020) 2014, mixed media, cm 120×50 (Dyptich)



Paesaggio invisibile – hidden landscape (PI-014) 2014, mixed media, cm 220×170



Paesaggio invisibile – hidden landscape (PI-014) 2014, mixed media, cm 220×170



The willingness to achieve an evanescent production (the material objective of this work), alongside the desire to create a work with evocative power (the ultimate goal of the same work) represent elements that were pursued, and hopefully attained by means of a process in large characterised by the use of the actual medium. The imperceptible modulation of the different shades of blacks used sometimes more opaque and other times more brilliant, or rather a contrast of pure and blended

shades made it possible to sustain a continuous îscopic varianceî of to the work. Similarly, the approach contended with during the application of the colour achieved through layered applications or by way of a more a substantial medium has allowed the light (used here as a principal technique on par with the brushes, paint and canvas) to impress added scope and latitude upon the work, thus becoming a tangible tool (side by side the other mediums employed).



Paesaggio invisibile – hidden landscape (PI-021) 2015, mixed media, cm 170×122 (element 4 – Polyptych)



Paesaggio invisibile – hidden landscape (PI-021) 2015, mixed media, cm 170×122 (element 2 – Polyptych)



Paesaggio invisibile – hidden landscape (PI-018) 2014, mixed media, cm 120×50 (Dyptich)



Paesaggio invisibile – hidden landscape (PI-016) 2014, mixed media, cm 110×90



nce completed, the work brought to life in addition to the already mentioned, yet transient, creative satisfaction a true element of surprise, in the ability to contrast the final result to the prevision that had been made prior to the realisation of the work. The creative compulsion that underlined the realisation of these works is

accentuated by the possibility to drive or induce an evocative îimpulseî in their materialisation. We are referring to transient images that change with variations in light, or even with minute adjustments of their visual angle on the part of the observer. From a pure black, the observer passes to a sort of visual intuition, until a holistic vision of

the image is attained. Even here, or better said, especially here, the perceptual gap manifested by the apprehension of the image thus realised, has attained its ultimate goal: to conquer the so called sensory fatigue and attain emotional fulfilment.

Milan march 20 2013



Paesaggio invisibile – hidden landscape (PI-011) 2014, mixed media, cm 220×170



Paesaggio invisibile – hidden landscape (PI-021) 2015, mixed media, cm 170×122 (element 1 – Polyptych)



Paesaggio invisibile – hidden landscape (PI-023) 2015, mixed media, cm 220×160